Condition

Oedema

Description

Oedema is an abnormal accumulation of fluid in the interstitium, which are locations beneath the skin or in one or more cavities of the body. It is clinically shown as swelling. Generally, the amount of interstitial fluid is determined by the balance of fluid homeostasis, and increased secretion of fluid into the interstitium or impaired removal of this fluid may cause oedema.

 
An oedema will occur in specific organs as part of inflammations, tendinitis or pancreatitis, for instance. Certain organs develop oedema through tissue specific mechanisms.
Examples of edema in specific organs:
Cerebral oedema is extracellular fluid accumulation in the brain. It can occur in toxic or abnormal metabolic states and conditions such as systemic lupus or reduced oxygen at high altitudes. It causes drowsiness or loss of consciousness.
Pulmonary oedema occurs when the pressure in blood vessels in the lung is raised because of obstruction to remove blood via the pulmonary veins. This is usually due to failure of the left ventricle of the heart. It can also occur in altitude sickness or on inhalation of toxic chemicals. Pulmonary edema produces shortness of breath. Pleural effusions may occur when fluid also accumulates in the pleural cavity.
Oedema may also be found in the cornea of the eye with glaucoma, severe conjunctivitis or keratitis or after surgery. It may produce coloured haloes around bright lights.
Oedema surrounding the eyes is called periorbital edema or eye puffiness. The periorbital tissues are most noticeably swollen immediately after waking, perhaps as a result of the gravitational redistribution of fluid in the horizontal position.
 
Another cutaneous form of oedema is myxedema, which is caused by increased deposition of connective tissue. In myxedema (and a variety of other rarer conditions) oedema is caused by an increased tendency of the tissue to hold water within its extracellular space. In myxedema this is because of an increase in hydrophilic carbohydrate-rich molecules (perhaps mostly hyaluronan) deposited in the tissue matrix. Oedema forms more easily in dependent areas in the elderly (sitting in chairs at home or on aeroplanes) and this is not well understood. Estrogens alter body weight in part through changes in tissue water content. There may be a variety of poorly understood situations in which transfer of water from tissue matrix to lymphatics is impaired because of changes in the hydrophilicity of the tissue or failure of the 'wicking' function of terminal lymphatic capillaries.
In lymphoedema abnormal removal of interstitial fluid is caused by failure of the lymphatic system. This may be due to obstruction from, for example, pressure from a cancer or enlarged lymph nodes, destruction of lymph vessels by radiotherapy, or infiltration of the lymphatics by infection (such as elephantiasis). It is most commonly due to a failure of the pumping action of muscles due to immobility, most strikingly in conditions such as multiple sclerosis, or paraplegia. It has been suggested that the edema that occurs in some people following use of aspirin-like cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors such as ibuprofen or indomethacin may be due to inhibition of lymph heart action.
Hydrops fetalis is a condition of the fetus characterized by an accumulation of fluid, or edema, in at least two fetal compartments.

Other names

Dropsy, Hydropsy

  • Specialities
  • Procedures
  • Medical teams
  • Medical centres
  • Professionals

Medical centres

Clinics

Sohail Physiotherapy Clinic Av Santa Amalia, 24 Fuengirola

Hospitals

Vithas Xanit International Hospital Avenida de los Argonautas, s/n Benalmádena
Vithas Parque San Antonio Hospital Avda del Pintor Joaquín Sorolla, 2 Málaga
Hospital El Angel Calle Corregidor Nicolás Isidro 16 Málaga

Professionals

Physiotherapy & Rehabilitation
Physiotherapy & Rehabilitation
Physiotherapy & Rehabilitation
Physiotherapy & Rehabilitation